Support WhoWhatWhy
FRESH TAKES | news, content and perspective you might not find elsewhere

“Coca-Cola plant” takes on a whole new meaning

Cool billboard, but Coke still ain’t good for you

We’ve got mixed feelings about the World Wildlife Fund, which has tended to excessive coziness with big corporations. But sometimes, something good comes out of that chumminess. For example, this:

Over in the Philippines, Coca-Cola and the WWF have teamed up to create a billboard that actually absorbs pollution. The 60-by-60-foot billboard is covered in Fukien tea plants. These bonsai trees suck up as much as 13 pounds of carbon dioxide each in a single year. Altogether, one billboard absorbs nearly 50,000 pounds of carbon dioxide, according to the botanist Anthony Gao.

The overall billboard is green too. The bonsais are held in 3,600 pots fashioned out of old coke bottles. The plants grow out, sideways. According to Adweek, the potting mixture comes from organic fertilizers and industrial byproducts.

No explanation of why this happened first in the Philippines, or when we might expect Coke culture to begin soaking up the LA smog.

Anyway, we judge this way cool, and look forward to seeing whether the perennially competitive Pepsi will post billboards with twice the positive impact.

And by the way, we still hate billboards and crass consumerism.

Have a nice day.

 

 

GRAPHIC:  http://uploads.neatorama.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/green-billboard2-500×448.jpg


Comment Policy:
Keep it civil. Keep it relevant. Keep it clear. Keep it short. Identify your assertions as fact or speculation. No typing in ALL-CAPS. Read the article in its entirety before commenting.

Note: As a news site dedicated to serious inquiry, not a bulletin board, we reserve the right to remove any comment at any time, especially when it appears to be part of an effort to push a deceptive, unscientific, false or narrow ideological line. Posts that scapegoat by ethnicity, gender, religion or nationality will also be removed.
More in Criminal Justice, Fresh Takes, Our Investigations (143 of 818 articles)